Fluctuations 13 July 16

Fluctuations is updated throughout the day, with thoughts, correction, and new links. Check in with us at the end of the day to see if you’ve missed anything or if you want to comment. Have a great day.

Good morning,

The June issues of Buildings magazine has Solar financing article. 7 Solar Financing Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. Check it out.

From Decentralized-Energy

$1bn in potential savings identified through Boston microgrids

Here are a few important points:
Microgrid islanding capability enables local energy resiliency, and aggregating DER in a microgrid can enable easier valuation of DER costs and benefits.

Evaluating a microgrid’s return on investment requires a robust understanding of generation and load characteristics, utility structure, energy markets, regulatory environment, and risks associated with an individual project.

Following that step the team identify an ‘anchor building’ for a microgrid. The anchor building is one that demands enough energy to justify the investment in local infrastructure upgrades for establishing a microgrid. Siting a microgrid in the location of an anchor building makes an infrastructure investment palatable to the city and encourages local stakeholders to consider connecting to the microgrid. Read more HERE

Bill Introduced to Give Businesses and Homeowners a Tax Credit for Energy Storage Use

US Senator Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), a member of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, has co-sponsored the Energy Storage Tax Incentive and Deployment Act, a bipartisan bill to establish investment tax credits (ITC) for business and home use of energy storage.  The proposed tax incentives are modeled on the current ITCs for solar energy and apply to either large, grid-connected energy storage systems or to smaller battery systems for residential power. Home battery storage, coupled with a small wind or roof-top solar system, could be used to store energy during the day for use later in the day or during overcast skies and to help consumers reduce their energy bills.

Solar Power: For The Masses Or The Wealthy?

Residential solar, says SolarPulse, is now a financial decision, not an environmental one. SolarPulse’s data includes a measure of the “environmental orientation” of households based on their purchasing behavior and this shows that environmental concerns are becoming less of a factor. As solar prices drop, solar is actually becoming a way to save money. This is mirrored in the dropping of the credit score required to get a financed solar package.

A New Report Reveals the Impact of Installing 8 Million Solar Panels Across America

SolarCity, one of the United States’ biggest solar developers, has published a report exploring the impact of installing 8 million solar panels across America. SolarCity released its first corporate sustainability report, measuring the impact the company has had on the environment, job creation, economic development, and society. Closing in on its 10-year anniversary, SolarCity has installed more than 8 million solar panels across the United States, servicing more than 250,000 customers. The new report, SolarCity 2015 Impact Report, asks what impact it has had on the planet over that period.

Solar panels study reveals impact on the Earth

Environmental Scientists at Lancaster University and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology monitored a large solar park, near Swindon, for a year.

They found that solar parks altered the local climate, measuring cooling of as much as 5 degrees Centigrade under the panels during the summer but the effects varied depending on the time of year and the time of day.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-07-solar-panels-reveals-impact-earth.html#jCp

That’s it friends. Have a great evening.

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No. 01 – Is SolarCity’s move to cease operations in Nevada indicative of all companies operating there?

That is what I planned on finding out, but unfortunately getting through to some of the entities there was harder than I thought.

After reading about SolarCity I felt that the Solar Power market would now be open to small to mid-size companies. Maybe they would be able to capitalize on the news and start to market to their service;”We’re still here.” I went on line, typed in solar installers in Nevada. I printed out a list of about twenty companies operating in Nevada. I called eight that looked reputable, and didn’t get through to anyone. Not one. One company’s number led me to a little old lady; sorry Ma’am. Most of them had answering services; “for our directory press 1.” No wonder national companies are able to dominate the market, there’s no competition. And now the impression is that there’s no market at all. SolarCity’s announcement is dominating the discussion about Solar in Nevada.  I was expecting to reach people that would be willing to discuss their plans to innovate, advertise, and fight for market share. I wanted to know whether their customers had questions, whether they even thought that the decision actually hurt the Nevada solar market. I also wanted to know whether or not there was a demographic that could still be marketed to, such as conservationist, empty-nesters, upper middle-class owners, green renovators, off-grid homeowners, farmers, and businesses. Tomorrow NV Energy is supposed to submit their rate plan for Net-metering, I’d be nice to hear from the industry, not just SolarCity, about their plans for 2016 under the new rate scheme. Stay tuned.

SolarCity/Silevo to build 1GW+ plant

No one ever accused Elon Musk’s companies of thinking small: In a blog post discussing SolarCity’s (SCTY) acquisition of module developer Silevo, the company states it’s in talks with the state of NY to build an initial module plant with “a targeted capacity of greater than 1GW.”
Moreover, the company will later build “one or more significantly larger plants at an order of magnitude greater annual production capacity.”
SolarCity, in remarks that bring to mind Tesla’s Gigafactory plans: “Our intent is to combine what we believe is fundamentally the best photovoltaic technology with massive economies of scale to achieve a breakthrough in the cost of solar power.”
In spite of today’s module capacity glut, SolarCity asserts shortages are only a matter of time as solar demand grows, in the absence of huge investments. SolarCity has thus far relied on 3rd-party module suppliers for its installations.
Silevo claims its Triex technology enables solar cells with 22%+ efficiency and 5%-12% greater energy harvest in arid climates, while remaining cost-competitive with low-cost silicon cell producers. The company has been eying both residential/commercial and utility-scale projects.

http://m.seekingalpha.com/news/1804173

SolarCity Corp (SCTY) news: 3 Solid Reasons Why SolarCity’s Drop Is An Opportunity – Seeking Alpha

http://seekingalpha.com/article/2135353-3-solid-reasons-why-solarcitys-drop-is-an-opportunity

Summary
SolarCity shares have lost steam in the past one month due to legal troubles.
SolarCity’s business has been progressing well, with strong megawatt deployments and cost reductions.
Prospects in the solar industry remain strong, so SolarCity should continue outperforming going forward.”