Critical weather situations for renewable energies – Part B: Low stratus risk for #solar power http://photovoltaic.pw/2iQaMb7

Abstract
Accurately predicting the formation, development and dissipation of fog and low stratus (LS) still poses a challenge for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Errors in the low cloud cover NWP forecasts directly impact the quality of photovoltaic (PV) power prediction. On days with LS, day-ahead forecast errors of Germany-wide PV power frequently lie within the magnitude of the balance energy and thus pose a challenge for maintaining grid stability. An indication in advance about the possible occurrence of a critical weather situation such as LS would represent a helpful tool for transmission system operators (TSOs) in their day-to-day business. In the following, a detection algorithm for low stratus risk (LSR) is developed and applied as post-processing to the NWP model forecasts of the regional non-hydrostatic model COSMO-DE, operational at the German Weather Service. The aim of the LSR product is to supply day-ahead warnings and to support the decision making process of the TSOs. The quality of the LSR is assessed by comparing the computed regions of LSR occurrence with a satellite based cloud classification product from the Nowcasting Satellite Facility (NWCSAF). The results show that the LSR provides additional information that should in particular be useful for risk adverse users.

http://photovoltaic.pw/2iQaMb7

Commercial #Solar + #Storage: A Cornucopia of Savings #Webinar photovoltaic.pw/2fRiItE courtesy of #UtilityDrive photovoltaic.pw/2fLyZO9

An Assessment of Efficient Water Heating Options for an All-Electric Single Family Residence in a Mixed Humid Climate | NIST

“An evaluation of a variety of efficient water heating strategies for an all-electric single family home located in a mixed-humid climate is conducted using numerical modeling. The strategies considered include various combinations of solar thermal, heat pump, and electric resistance water heaters. The numerical model used in the study is first validated against a year of field data obtained on a dual-tank system with a solar thermal preheat tank feeding a heat pump water heater that serves as a backup.”

https://www.nist.gov/node/1113446

New Survey Shows That Americans Significantly Overestimate #Renewable #Energy’s Role in Powering the Nation – Oil & Gas 360

“Americans overestimate the contribution of renewable energy in powering the U.S. and underestimate the role of coal, oil and natural gas now and in the future. In 2016, solar and wind together made up just 3% of U.S. energy consumption, while survey respondents put the figure at 20%. Furthermore, respondents predict that wind and solar will make up 34% of energy consumption in five years; however, the experts predict that they will be less than 5% of our energy consumption. Conversely, respondents perceived fossil fuels to be a much lower percentage of the energy mix than they are today and projected them to be even less in five years.”

http://www.oilandgas360.com/new-survey-shows-that-americans-significantly-overestimate-renewable-energys-role-in-powering-the-nation/

Fluctuations 13 July 16

Fluctuations is updated throughout the day, with thoughts, correction, and new links. Check in with us at the end of the day to see if you’ve missed anything or if you want to comment. Have a great day.

Good morning,

The June issues of Buildings magazine has Solar financing article. 7 Solar Financing Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. Check it out.

From Decentralized-Energy

$1bn in potential savings identified through Boston microgrids

Here are a few important points:
Microgrid islanding capability enables local energy resiliency, and aggregating DER in a microgrid can enable easier valuation of DER costs and benefits.

Evaluating a microgrid’s return on investment requires a robust understanding of generation and load characteristics, utility structure, energy markets, regulatory environment, and risks associated with an individual project.

Following that step the team identify an ‘anchor building’ for a microgrid. The anchor building is one that demands enough energy to justify the investment in local infrastructure upgrades for establishing a microgrid. Siting a microgrid in the location of an anchor building makes an infrastructure investment palatable to the city and encourages local stakeholders to consider connecting to the microgrid. Read more HERE

Bill Introduced to Give Businesses and Homeowners a Tax Credit for Energy Storage Use

US Senator Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), a member of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, has co-sponsored the Energy Storage Tax Incentive and Deployment Act, a bipartisan bill to establish investment tax credits (ITC) for business and home use of energy storage.  The proposed tax incentives are modeled on the current ITCs for solar energy and apply to either large, grid-connected energy storage systems or to smaller battery systems for residential power. Home battery storage, coupled with a small wind or roof-top solar system, could be used to store energy during the day for use later in the day or during overcast skies and to help consumers reduce their energy bills.

Solar Power: For The Masses Or The Wealthy?

Residential solar, says SolarPulse, is now a financial decision, not an environmental one. SolarPulse’s data includes a measure of the “environmental orientation” of households based on their purchasing behavior and this shows that environmental concerns are becoming less of a factor. As solar prices drop, solar is actually becoming a way to save money. This is mirrored in the dropping of the credit score required to get a financed solar package.

A New Report Reveals the Impact of Installing 8 Million Solar Panels Across America

SolarCity, one of the United States’ biggest solar developers, has published a report exploring the impact of installing 8 million solar panels across America. SolarCity released its first corporate sustainability report, measuring the impact the company has had on the environment, job creation, economic development, and society. Closing in on its 10-year anniversary, SolarCity has installed more than 8 million solar panels across the United States, servicing more than 250,000 customers. The new report, SolarCity 2015 Impact Report, asks what impact it has had on the planet over that period.

Solar panels study reveals impact on the Earth

Environmental Scientists at Lancaster University and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology monitored a large solar park, near Swindon, for a year.

They found that solar parks altered the local climate, measuring cooling of as much as 5 degrees Centigrade under the panels during the summer but the effects varied depending on the time of year and the time of day.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-07-solar-panels-reveals-impact-earth.html#jCp

That’s it friends. Have a great evening.

High Heat High Demand and Panel Efficiency

In case you haven’t heard we’re inching toward a record heatwave summer. With that comes warnings of blackouts and calls to conserve energy. In essence, the fodder of the solar power industry, the need for an energy source that supplements the current infrastructure; demand response energy, but what about efficiency during those high heat high demand days?

Unbeknownst to most people is that solar panel output is reduced at high temperatures, and over extended periods can lead to premature degradation. While the current increases the overall performance of the system decreases. 

The standard Temperatue-rise coefficient for Solar Farms, where the rear of the panels are open and exposed to wind, is a 20 degree rise, while panel mounted on a roof are said to see at least a 45 degree rise in cell temperature. The temperature translation for a 45 degree rise is a 10% reduction in voltage produced. 

Read this article on Solar Panel efficiency utilizing heat

Also: Photovoltaic Efficiency: The Temperature Effect PDF

Also: Enhancing the performance of photovoltaic panels by water cooling PDF

No. 02 – Bullish on #Solar – #Stocks

What happens to an industry when the big names get hammered in the stock market? Everyone begins to worry.

SolarCity and Sunrun were once the market darlings but are now casualties of their own fame and the momentum of a larger downward trend in all markets, especial the oil industry. Cheap oil has reduced the urgency to switch to solar, at least in the consumers’mind.

But what about stocks? I though COP21 would have had a stronger affect on renewables. In 2014 I wrote about the solar trade war and how China would be left with glut of solar panels unless the Middle East and India stepped in the buy up the supply. It was surprising to hear Saudi Arabia  ambitiously tout their renewable energy plans, even implying that they would reduce their reliance on oil. Well, now we see the fruits of those seeds. (Saudi Arabia was smart enough to put quite a bit of cash in its sovereign wealth fund (which was the third largest in the world) to reduce the impact of the economic shocks.)

And what about Neveda and Net-metering? The debate has grown increasingly hot in Hawaii and Nevada, leading me to believe that utilities have fround their golden nugget. Nevada is a bear market for solar. Could that wave spread to other states and jurisdictions? Forget Big Oil, beware of Big Utility.

I’ve sold solar stocks toward the end of 2015, and the remaining stocks I have are so devalued that it wouldn’t make a difference if I continued to hold them. They can only increase in value. And that’s the outlook for solar – it can only get better, but it might get worst before it does.

[Update on my attempt to contact Solar companies operating in Nevada: I did receive one call from a gentleman operating there, and I want to apologize for not calling him back. Talk to you soon.]

Economic and technical assessment of solar tracking system for solar panels via EnergyBiz

“One hour of solar energy is enough to meet the energy demand of entire Earth’s population for one year.

When the solar radiation reaches earth’s top atmosphere it is relatively constant everywhere but the radiation near earth’s surface may vary considerably due to following reasons:

  • – Atmospheric effects, such as absorption and scattering.
  • – local variations in the atmosphere, such as water vapour, clouds, and pollution;
  • – latitude of the location; and
  • – the season of the year and the time of day.”

By Emma White at EnergyBiz.com

Also interesting: Clouds, Pollution and Solar Radiation

Solar panels just broke another record in the U.S. by Katie Fehrenbacher | Fortune.com

“…the amount of U.S. residential solar panels has been growing more rapidly, and has been expanding across more states than ever before. The amount of home solar roofs grew 70% year-over-year for the most recent quarter, and went from four states with vibrant residential solar markets in 2013, to ten states today.” 

Let’s be clear, the theory is that every home can, and should be powered by Solar Power.