No. 01 – Is SolarCity’s move to cease operations in Nevada indicative of all companies operating there?

That is what I planned on finding out, but unfortunately getting through to some of the entities there was harder than I thought.

After reading about SolarCity I felt that the Solar Power market would now be open to small to mid-size companies. Maybe they would be able to capitalize on the news and start to market to their service;”We’re still here.” I went on line, typed in solar installers in Nevada. I printed out a list of about twenty companies operating in Nevada. I called eight that looked reputable, and didn’t get through to anyone. Not one. One company’s number led me to a little old lady; sorry Ma’am. Most of them had answering services; “for our directory press 1.” No wonder national companies are able to dominate the market, there’s no competition. And now the impression is that there’s no market at all. SolarCity’s announcement is dominating the discussion about Solar in Nevada.  I was expecting to reach people that would be willing to discuss their plans to innovate, advertise, and fight for market share. I wanted to know whether their customers had questions, whether they even thought that the decision actually hurt the Nevada solar market. I also wanted to know whether or not there was a demographic that could still be marketed to, such as conservationist, empty-nesters, upper middle-class owners, green renovators, off-grid homeowners, farmers, and businesses. Tomorrow NV Energy is supposed to submit their rate plan for Net-metering, I’d be nice to hear from the industry, not just SolarCity, about their plans for 2016 under the new rate scheme. Stay tuned.

Advertisements

Solar panels just broke another record in the U.S. by Katie Fehrenbacher | Fortune.com

“…the amount of U.S. residential solar panels has been growing more rapidly, and has been expanding across more states than ever before. The amount of home solar roofs grew 70% year-over-year for the most recent quarter, and went from four states with vibrant residential solar markets in 2013, to ten states today.” 

Let’s be clear, the theory is that every home can, and should be powered by Solar Power.

The Solar Rollover – When mandates are met, what next? (Short Form)

What happens when utilities meet their state mandates for renewable energy production or offsets?

In the coming years we could run into a schedule, and desirable – from the utilities point of view, loll in Solar. States are canceling, re-assessing, or no longer interested in initiating rebates for renewable energy because utilities have moved to capitalize on the financial benefits provided to them. It has also quieted the calls to speed up adoption of Solar Energy. It is eating its nemesis, alive.

So, what will keep solar alive, absent rebates and offsets? It will be advances is panel efficiency, battery design, and inverter technology.

[Stay tuned as I revise this post. Thanks. ]

Newsday.com

Solar energy appears to finally be coming of age.

In July, Bloomberg New Energy Finance declared that we are in the midst of a “solar revolution” and the firm predicted that solar will be the fastest-growing form of global generation capacity through 2030. A few days after that report was released, Deutsche Bank announced plans to lend $1 billion to support solar deployment in Japan.

About 400,000 U.S. homes now have solar panels on their roofs. One of those homes is the White House. Last year, after a 27-year sabbatical, solar panels were installed on the roof of America’s most famous house.

http://www.newsday.com/opinion/oped/yes-solar-is-booming-but-robert-bryce-1.9207529?view=print

Chevron Puts Hawaiian Solar Projects on Ice – Businessweek | http://mobile.businessweek.com/articles/2014-08-13/chevron-puts-hawaiian-renewale-energy-projects-on-hold

http://mobile.businessweek.com/articles/2014-08-13/chevron-puts-hawaiian-renewale-energy-projects-on-hold

The tabled projects, first reported earlier this week by Pacific Business News, include a farm of solar panels that would have spanned almost five acres, supplying as much as 1 megawatt of electricity to the local utility. Chevron also shelved a demonstration solar thermal project, which would have covered about 15 acres and used mirrors to generate steam to help power the Hawaii refinery.

In recent months, Chevron, the second-biggest oil company in the U.S., has quietly been pulling back from renewable-energy endeavors, despite a long-promoted commitment to develop what its corporate website calls “newer, cleaner ways to power the world.”

LADWP to hire staff, streamline its applications for solar customers – latimes.com

http://www.latimes.com/business/money/la-fi-mo-ladwp-solar-program-20140319,0,312844.story?track=rss#axzz2wRke7iIt

Prospective solar customers have had to endure delays and a lot of bureaucratic run around to install solar power, but municipalities are finally easing some of the back log. Do you have any stories about delays or rejections you’ve experienced trying to have your solar system installed?

Power 3.0

Power generation, currently, is equivalent to rubbing two sticks together. We need to start viewing it as a technology, because more and more the electricity demand will come from technology – smartphones, smart TV, smart appliances, and smart cars, leading to a mature smart grid that will regulate how hard we run those two sticks together.